Readers & Reviews

Readers write

Denna Holm (website and GoodReads)
By the end I felt as though I knew each one of these people on a personal basis. We feel their pain, their fears, and their desperation to keep painful secrets hidden from prying eyes.
Isabel G (by email)
I just finished The Subtle Thief of Youth and I loved it. I actually liked it quite a bit better than A C***** V******!
Jim C (posted in bookreview thread on club forum)
I really enjoyed the slow building of the tension and partial unravelling of the protagonists and I didn’t see the end coming as it did, but then I never do . . .
Amanda M (by email)
Brilliant, I thoroughly enjoyed it and am hoping you’ve started another . . .

Reviewers write

oxford_timesRichard Jones, reviewing The Subtle Thief of Youth in the Oxford Times on Jan 3rd 2013, wrote

As with any good murder mystery, the reader is led down several blind alleys until we reach the surprising denouement. However, the whodunnit is made credible as the author brings us to the eureka moment by cleverly mixing the past with the present to give a balanced picture of the place and time. Ultimately though, this is a tragic tale of the spirit of youth being extinguished by the emotional corruption of adulthood.

The full review may be seen at The Oxford Times.

Helen Ward, reviewer for Daily Info Oxford has written about The Subtle Thief of Youth. Here is an extract
You would have thought that the scenario of a couple of bodies turning up in a sleepy Cotswold village had been done to – erm – death, but in The Subtle Thief of Youth, Oxfordshire author DJ Wiseman rises to the challenge to produce an intriguing and original mystery.
In this, his second novel, Wiseman demonstrates a real gift for creating and telling a strong, carefully crafted story. Despite some uneven characterisation – the author lavishes more care on the cash strapped and semi-criminal Duncans and the well-heeled, but distinctly “outsider” Samarasinghes, than the vicar or the landed gentry – the author still paints a worryingly credible picture of the way in which obsessions with class, appearance and the need to belong can destroy lives and communities.
The complete review can be seen at Daily Info Oxford. To see a complete list of Helen Ward’s Daily Info reviews click here, and to see her Amazon reviews click here.

Simon Humphreys, author: In ”The Subtle Thief Of Youth”, D.J.Wiseman has woven the dark threads  of mystery, intrigue and suspense, into  a colourful fabric of the finest quality. The insecurities and consciences of the residents of the two villages – twinned by location not desire, fester and bubble; hidden for years, until exposed by a freak of nature and the unrelenting prodding and poking of a diligent young constable. As surely as the great deluge stripped away the landscape of the Parish, the secrets of the villagers are peeled back and exposed, revealing the painful raw truth of the past. This beautifully layered tale will transport the reader into the very heart and soul of Germans and Whyncombe St. Giles.

Alex MacLeod, author: The setting for DJ Wiseman’s latest novel is twin villages in the English countryside near Oxford where one might expect decent behavior and benign weather. This is not the case with “The Subtle Thief of Youth”. The weather gets under your clothes and the residents of Whyncombe St. Giles and Germans get under your hat. “The Subtle Thief of Youth” is exciting for me – its wet and wild beginning and the excitement is maintained not so much by the fast pace but by a relentless probing into the dangerous mixture of self interest and self-righteousness in the villages. Be prepared to let your regular daily tasks slip by – it’s hard to put this book down.

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